June’s FEH Experience Part 1

Because I have SO MUCH to say, I’ve broken this post up into two parts. This post will be about June, and the next one will be about the actual event and FEH experience.

We loaded up and left Wednesday morning for our 11-12 hour drive. That’s right. I was driving up to 12 hours for an FEH class. Living in Idaho makes these sorts of drives seem normal. It was HOT for much of the drive, but Sarah’s trailer had great ventilation and June looked perky and happy at all our stops. Since this was a two-day event for all but the FEH classes, we were pretty much the first to arrive besides the organizers. June settled in like a champ and I have to say, she’s already pretty much a pro about traveling and going places by herself.

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Don’t worry she didn’t dump me, I just have a random lunging photo

Thursday was going to be HOT, but I wasn’t sure if I wanted to ride June early, or later, when there was a bit more atmosphere. I ended up lunging her in the AM and she was a good girl. I think she was happy to get out of her stall and stretch her legs. People began to arrive and so I decided to hop on her around 11:30. I think that because so many people were arriving, and there was more going on, June was a bit more antsy. I decided to lunge her before hopping on and wouldn’t you know it, she had a few bucks in her… She bucked so hard that she got away from me and cantered back to her stall. Lucky for me, the woman who caught her said “Same thing happened to us last year.” Eventers are the nicest.

I had planned on riding by myself, just hacking around and doing some walk/trot work, but now I was a bit nervous that I wouldn’t have the horse I knew back at home. So, Sarah happily came with me, and I ended up having an impromptu lesson. June was basically perfect in that she wasn’t spooky, didn’t buck and handled the going ons with no issue. There wasn’t an arena, so I was a bit nervous to canter-I’ve never cantered June in the open before. But, as we settled in, I opted to do some canter work.

It went ok except for one thing. I could not for the life of me get June to pick up her right lead canter. This hadn’t ever been an issue. She was solid on her leads. I think she’s maybe once picked up the wrong lead? So, we worked for a while and got it. Then got it again, and called it a day.

I checked my ride time again Thursday afternoon and was excited to see that there were two more people entered in our division. I became less excited when I realized they were both seasoned, upper level, professionals, but still, it would be nice to share the arena with other horses.

Our ride time wasn’t until 3:40 on Friday so I spent the morning walking June around and just letting her see everything that was going on. Last thing I wanted was for her to be surprised there were a lot of horses and people here now. I braided her at the trailer since our stalls were far from us, and I didn’t feel like hauling all my crap down there. She was distracted and a bit antsy but we got it done. She looked pretty damn cute all braided.

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When I hopped on June to go warm up, she was a bit high. There was only one place to warm up/ride on the entire property. Because there was also a dressage schooling show going on, and people were riding their horses on their own, the warm up area was a bit chaotic. June got down there, threw her neck and head high up into the air and took it all in. Then I proceeded to make her walk around the arenas and by our second time around, she was cool as a cucumber. Love her brain.

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PNW eventing sure is beautiful

There were horses coming at us, bikes riding by us, children screaming ( I may have imagined that) and I was trying to steer and listen to Sarah through all of it. It went ok. She was super fussy in the bridle, tossing her head, but paying attention. Canter left went ok. (In that I didn’t run into anyone or run away). Canter right was not happening. I think I tried 8 times to get the correct lead? And I couldn’t get it done before we were called to begin the class.

At this point I got a chance to see the other horses in my class. My first thought? “Well, we’ll still be happy with 3rd place!” Honestly. I really didn’t pay much attention to the other horses or riders, but it was VERY clear they were much further along in their training than June was. They were round and on the bit. One, who ended up winning, was stunning. Beautiful mover and clearly this wasn’t her first show. The other was a really good-looking OTTB who had filled out nicely  and looked to be a solid citizen despite only having come off the track this spring. I found out later that the winning horse was entered at Novice (but moved down to BN) and the OTTB was entered Intro. They came in 4th and 2nd, respectively, in their divisions. These were really nice 4 year olds!

But, really, my goal was to get a regional championships qualifying score, and that would be based on my horse, and how we did, not on the others. So, we entered the dressage arena and began to show our horses off at the walk. And then the trot. And then we changed direction.  June was fuss busing the entire time, I couldn’t really get a good connection or get the trot I really wanted. But that was ok, because we were staying in the arena and she was not spooky or completely distracted by her environment.

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After the walk and trot, two of us were asked to exit the arena so the one horse could canter. She was asked to pick up the canter on a 20 meter circle.

And this is where I began to panic.

I haven’t done any work at the canter on a 20 meter circle. I thought we would be using the entire arena. I thought we would be essentially doing an equitation class. Had I read this somewhere? Had I made it up? I don’t know. What I did know was this would be our very first 20 meter canter…

It wasn’t great. We got to go left first (thank God) and June picked up the canter, and then fell out of it coming out of the corner. We got it again and kept it. But it was long and strung out and not the canter I wanted to show off.

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And then we went right. Before the class I asked Sarah “So, I just keep trying for the correct lead, right?” She said yes, but we both knew there was a chance June may not show off her right lead canter.

She didn’t get it on the first try.

She didn’t get it on the second try.

And right before the third try I whispered to her “June, please don’t do this to me.”

And we got the correct lead.

We veered around that circle and there was zero pretty about it. But, we got the correct lead.

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I am excited for what this canter will be one day

The woman on the OTTB also had difficulty with her horse getting the correct lead but she was far faster at resolving the problem. She did it in one stride, it took me 2-3 to get June back to the trot, and then try again.

And then we were asked to remove our saddles for the conformation portion. June was a good girl for this, but at one point she cocked a back foot and I was like “Uh, no, you can’t be lazy right now,” and made her stand with all four feet on the ground.

At the end of the class, when the three of us were standing with our horses in a line, the judge came up to us and told us we should all be very proud of our horses for handling this environment as well as they did and that was so pleased to see 3 very different, but very nice, horses. She said something nice about each horse, and for June it was something like “She was a bit green today, but she is a lovely, athletic, type.”

Yup, she is. She’s also quite green. Which is why we entered an FEH class. But more on that later.

June was such a good girl and I am really happy with how well she behaved and how she took it all in stride. I had no idea what to expect at her first show, and I learned that I can ask more of her, she’s not going to be fazed by all that is going on around her.

We did come in 3rd place, but we were more competitively scored than I expected. And, we qualified for championships, which was my goal!

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Yes, flip flops. I literally took her out, took the pic and put her back. It’ll never happen again, I promise.

June had a good night, and she traveled home like a champ. She handled the long travel days really well and today was happy to go out on pasture and eat as much grass as she wanted. She’ll have a couple of days off and then we’ll be right back to work. This mare is so fun and I can’t wait to continue learning with her.

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I have SO MANY thoughts about this event, and I can’t wait to share them with you in my next post.

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Bridle Shopping

It’s tough with a baby horse to put money into things they may outgrow or not need anymore. Well, let me re-phrase that. It is hard for ME to put money into things June may outgrow or no longer need. She’s wearing Georgie’s Kool Coat this weekend at the show despite it being way too large. I’m waiting for her to fill out and get some muscle before  making a dressage saddle purchase and I’ve been piecing together tack for her to wear in our day-to-day rides. While I solidly believe fit is important, that’s about where my investment has ended in her tack.

I don’t currently have a show worthy brown bridle for her, so when prepping for the FEH class I asked Sarah if she had one I could borrow. And lucky me, she did! A really pretty Schockemole bridle that she got in Ireland. It was a cob size, but I feel like June’s horse size bridle is a bit on the large size, so wasn’t too worried about fit. Well, it wasn’t until I tried to fasten the noseband that I realized this bridle was not going to work. Pretty much everything fit except the noseband. It wasn’t close to being large enough.

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Luckily, Sarah had another bridle I could try. Only problem? It’s navy. (Yes she has a navy bridle. I didn’t even know such a thing existed.) And while I will be riding with my navy saddle pad, I was REALLY hoping to have June wear a brown bridle with her brand new, beautiful, Dark Jewel Designs browband. Amelia from DJD was even kind enough to get it to me in time for the competition! But adding a brown browband to a navy bridle just isn’t gong to work. I decided a nice, clean, not put together mishappenly bridle is the priority. So, because I really, really, want to show off her new blingy browbands, and have a show worthy bridle, I’m looking to you blogosphere! Help me find a bridle! Here is my must have list:

-dark brown

-jumper bridle

-up to $200

Yes, that is my list. But I really, really need to stick to that budget because I still have a lot of things I am trying to pay off, like Stella’s surgery…. So those beautiful Vespucci bridles are not going to be considered. I’d be up for a used bridle if you have a nice one, but it would have to be in show worthy condition.

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A Schockemohle contender…

Let me know what you love, what to avoid and help me get June looking her best!

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FEH Prep

I leave WEDNESDAY for Washington, where June will be competing in the 4yr old FEH class. Right now it looks like she’s her biggest competitor. Since she’s the only one entered in the class. I’m super bummed about this for a multitude of reasons, but primarily because I want these classes to be supported. I love that  USEA created these classes as an alternate to the YEH classes, but from what I’ve seen here in Area 7, not many people are attending them. Which is a huge bummer.

And while really, June is only competing against herself despite how many horses may be in the class, it would be nice for the judge to have other horses to keep her eyes on. Sure, this will be more like a dressage test in that all eyes are on me, but yikes, an equitation style class seemed way more appealing when I signed up.

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I mean, yes this is cute to look at, but still…

Regardless, June and I are walking, trotting, and cantering pretty solidly. Sure, she can be behind the leg and a little lazy, but I am hoping that’s nothing a tap from a dressage whip can’t help!

A week ago an a**hole decided to shoot an exploding target in a campground (I don’t even know what an exploding target is) and he started a massive forest fire about 8 miles from our barn. When I say massive, I’m talking over 50,000 acres and it is still only about 49% contained. It has moved from where my barn is, north, to where a lot of friends live. They’re in “pre evacuation” notice, meaning get ready to get the hell out.

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Scary,scary shit PC: Blaine County Sheriff’s Office

As you can imagine, when there is a forest fire in your backyard, the smoke is thick and you can feel it in your lungs. It’s like a perpetual campfire you can’t get away from. I gave June two days off during the worst of it, and then, when the wind was blowing it out of our area, I brought her back into light work. It seems the worst of it has passed (thank you firefighters!) so we’ve resumed our normal schedule.

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When you do the Intro A test, there are lots of pics of you trotting

In our non riding/exercising days I practiced wrapping legs again, clipped her tail and bridle path and practiced braiding her mane. She was great for all of it.

I think we’re about as ready as we can be! I’m super excited to get outta dodge with my pony, dogs and BFF. It’ll be fun to see how June handles the atmosphere and if the judge thinks she’s as special a horse as I do.

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Fraggle Friday: Stella Milestones

Today marks two months from Stella’s first seizure.

When that seizure happened, I hoped I had one month, prayed for two months, with her. I heard brain tumors grew quickly, and 1-2 months was a reasonable prediction for how long she would have.

Stella had back surgery on April 10th. On that day I hoped she would make it through surgery and regain some mobility. I hoped she could walk on her own again. I never expected her to walk up stairs or run. At 14 years old, I kept my expectations in check for what this dog would be able to do.

But apparently I forgot it was Stella who had back surgery and a brain tumor. Stella, the dog who I joked, if she were a human, she would be a multi sport Olympian. This is not a dog who is going to sit around and let anything stop her.

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This photo was taken 7/13. Clearly she can run…. PC:Nate Liles

And, so, a summer of adventures began. And, because it was summer, our adventures have involved a LOT of time in the water.

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Amazing weekend trip to Stanley, Idaho. Stella hadn’t been in the water yet this summer, and I worried she would have trouble. She didn’t.

On this trip to Stanley, Stella realized she felt GOOD. She took off down a trail thinking that’s the way we were going. Bring that she is basically deaf, and totally independent, I ended up running after her down the trail for 5 minutes when it became clear she was not coming back to me.

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She’s still one of the strongest swimmers. Siri does her best to keep up

She still loves to play fetch, although sometimes she can’t actually see the stick once I’ve thrown it into the water…

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Ready to fetch!

And to be honest, some days are better for her than others. Yesterday she just wanted to sleep. It’s been hot and smokey so I pretty much feel the same way. I’ve stopped thinking “is this your last day?” every single day, and instead am just enjoying every single day we have together.

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Siri is really good at convincing Stella to cuddle

It’s been an incredibly fun summer with her, and I am so thankful I get to continue having her in my life!

 

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The Georgie Predicament

To catch you all up, Georgie went to her new lessee April 1st. She’s being leased by a junior rider who hasn’t done a whole lot of jumping and Georgie is the perfect match to help her build confidence in eventing.

I was super happy when I heard this gal would be riding Georgie. She’d be in a lesson program with Sarah, part of Pony Club, and I knew Georgie would love not being asked much in dressage while still getting to jump some small jumps.

I have the option of riding Georgie once a week to assess mental and physical soundness, and give any feedback to Sarah. Initially I thought I would DEFINITELY ride her weekly, but as the months have gone by, I’m riding her less and less. For one thing, Georgie doesn’t need me to ride her. I watch her with her new rider and she looks great. Sound and happy. Secondly, I have June to focus on. And while I did pony June off of Georgie one day, that ended up being a lot of work and not really stress free, so I haven’t done it since.

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This about sums up that ride

I’m lucky in that Georgie’s pen is next to June’s. The two mares have become buddies and get turned out together. When I bring June back from a ride, I give Georgie a treat before giving one to June, just so June knows where she stands in the hierarchy 😉

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I get to see lots of Georgie’s butt when she’s out on pasture..

My dilemma is this.

I love watching Georgie with her new rider, I honestly do. Of course there is a part of me that wishes I was still her rider, but dwelling on that does me no good. What’s harder for me, is watching Georgie succeed without me.

Does that seem weird/selfish/horrible? It probably is, but hear me out.

Georgie is currently competing at the Intro level in Pony Club events and doing up to 2’3 at jumper shows or derbies. This should come as no surprise, but she is rocking it at this level. Mare can “assume the position” in dressage and is far more put together than any other horse she is competing against. Get her out on cross country and she lopes around safely with an attitude of “just hang on, I got this.” And while she did hit a rail at her last event (which made me laugh out loud) the mare has got show jumping down, even if her rider has the tendency to jump ahead. Essentially, she is safest, most capable, horse out there.

The problem arises when people tell me things like “Georgie is amazing.” “Georgie is such a great dressage horse,” “Georgie is so easy.”

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Back in the day at Rebecca Farm

Yes, she is all of those things. But it took me years and a lot of work to get her that way. And when she wins competition after competition, all I can think is that I hope her rider realizes how lucky she is to have such a great horse. I hope her rider, and those commenting on how great she is, realize there was someone who helped create that. And that, right when she was at her peak, and the hard stuff started to get easier, I had to let her go.

I know it’s a testament to my hard work that Georgie is still easy and happy and retains lots of what we worked on together. But sometimes I don’t want to hear how great she is without a “you put a lot of work into her” at the end of it. Georgie has the best brain and the best work ethic, so she was easy on so many levels, but it doesn’t mean she magically became a great dressage horse, or easy to ride.

So therein lies my dilemma. Be happy for Georgie, and all the fun her new rider is having, without lamenting that I no longer have her, and am no longer the one succeeding with her. In the grand scheme of things, really not a big deal. But every once in a while I long for the good ole days, which seems only natural.

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The Dressage Training Pyramid

In our indoor arena Sarah has painted this on one of the walls:

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The well-known dressage training pyramid.

I spend a lot of time looking at this piece of art. When I was riding Macy, I wondered if we’d ever get to the pinnacle. I’d check off what we had accomplished after every ride, and ask questions like “So, today we had rhythm and impulsion, but not much relaxation. Do you have to go in order of the pyramid?”

I feel like this pyramid haunts me a little bit. It teases me by showing how much I have yet to achieve in my riding. It goads me into thinking that one day I can have true collection, but not without connection!

Now that June and I are solidly doing some WTC rides, the training pyramid is back on my mind. After last week’s lesson, I pointed to the pyramid and said “We don’t even have rhythm. How will we ever achieve rhythm????” I never in my life thought that achieving rhythm could be so hard.

But then yesterday, I looked at the pyramid and said “Watch this.”

And I engaged my core, applied my leg and asked for the trot. June maintained a beautiful rhythmic trot all the way around the arena.

“See THAT, pyramid??? There’s a lot more where THAT came from.”

Of course, I couldn’t maintain this trot for 3 circles, but hey, baby steps. Literally, baby steps.

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Speaking of baby steps, not only is June so much calmer when tied up, she allowed me to put standing wraps on her and wasn’t a freak about walking around in them!

This pyramid, while it taunts and goads me, is actually really cool to have as a visual when I ride. It gives me a goal to work on, of course, but also really makes me reflect on each ride and see what needs work and what needs progress.

Of course, I think we’ll be working on rhythm for quite some time, but that’s ok. You’ve got to start somewhere!

 

 

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June’s Baby Pictures

When posting pictures of baby horses, you don’t need a lot of text. So enjoy this media dump.

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A few hours after she was born

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Still wobbly, but has her priorities. Maybe she’ll have as many dapples as her momma!

 

JuneBug

About 3 weeks old.

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Oh hey! Just hanging with my momma

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I mean… that face!

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Like, could she be any more of a compact little muscle machine?

 

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A little camera shy… that will change

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Just thinking about how much trouble she wants to get into

 

I’m so thankful to her breeder for passing these photos along to me! Love seeing her as a little munchkin!

 

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June’s First Stock Horse Event

One of my favorite things about our barn is that there always seems to be something going on on the weekend. If Sarah isn’t hosting a Jumper or TOC show, our western riding trainer is hosting a horsemanship clinic, sorting show or stock horse event. And while June may not partake in all these events, it’s great for her to see trailers and horses coming in and activity all around. I want her to be used to chaos.

This past weekend our barn hosted a Stock Horse event. I didn’t really know what this was, other than you do a pattern and basically show good horsemanship and a calm and relaxed ride. I signed June up mainly because it seemed low key and would get her out and about with other horses.

I mean zero disrespect to the western riding discipline, but I was pretty surprised by how warm up went. There were about 15-20 horses in the outdoor arena, everyone was going every which way, and June had horses spinning (like fancy, western, spinning) cantering and sliding to a stop all around her.

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She needed a little encouragement in the chaos

All I could think was, dressage warm up is going to be a piece of cake if we keep doing this!

The event itself was lots of fun! It started in the outdoor arena with a pattern. June and I only walked and trotted but baby horse was SO good. We had to stop and turn (other horses spun), and trot out of the arena under some trees to another paddock, and at the end we had to open a gate while on her back. I figured that would go very badly, but actually, we got the gate open fairly simply. I couldn’t close it, but that was ok, I was happy with how it went considering I had never asked that of her.

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Siding up to the gate

Next we moved to another arena where there was an obstacle course. I hadn’t done this under saddle with June so just figured I would see how it went. She was resistant to go over some bridges (but not others, others she walked right over) and she wasn’t sure about the teeter totter at all. But at the end she happily walked through the elevated tires with no problem. I’m signing her up for an obstacle/trail course clinic in August so we can work on this. While I don’t think it’s a huge deal, I think it’s a confidence builder and the more slow, mental work we can do, the better.

Lastly, we entered the cow pen. Now, June hasn’t spent any time with cows other than when I turn her out in the paddock next to them. For this challenge we would be moving cows from one pen to another, and then keeping certain cows in certain areas. I figured I would get June in the pen with the cows, see how she reacted and maybe get her as close to them as possible.

Well, June had another idea. She wanted to get in the cow pen and start moving cows! Bossing cows around is right up her alley!

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She had absolutely no hesitation around the cows, and pushed them this way and that. I guess if eventing doesn’t work out she can be a ranch horse.

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Awfully proud of herself

In recapping the event to Sarah I told her that up until now, most of my tests of June have been to see how her brain would handle things. Her brain has handled everything well. Incredibly well. Moving forward I feel like I can stop worrying about how she’ll react to things and start asking more of her physically. Like, work on getting our steering more refined. And trotting a circle at the same pace the entire way around.

So here’s to boring circles and steering. I can’t wait!

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All The Things

I have so many posts I want to write, but time just hasn’t allowed for it. So, I’m going to try to catch you up here..get ready for ALL THE THINGS.

June continues to be fantastic. I’ve begun cantering her on my own and the highlight of last week was when a friend walked into the indoor arena as I was cantering and was like “woah! You both look so relaxed!”

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We’re both smiling

We are relaxed! It’s lovely! June doesn’t keep the canter for very long so I am working on applying leg and trying to use my body to keep her going. Honestly, I was so worried about her bucking if I sat or did something “wrong” that I spent the first two or three canter rides trying not to touch her. I’m over that now.

With the FEH coming up I am trying to get June to different places and see how she handles “atmosphere.” For this reason, and because it was cheap and easy, I entered her in a local TOC dressage show. The venue was about ten minutes away and would be very laid back.

I hauled June over, unloaded her, let her check the place out, lunged her, hopped on, did some walk/trot in warm up ( we entered intro A) walked to the arena and walked around, did our test and went home. It was THAT uneventful.

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Our first halt at X!

June was absolutely perfect and exceeded my expectations. Sure we still have trouble with steering and symmetry isn’t our jam, but she acted like she’s been going places and doing dressage for years. SUCH a good pony!!!

Knowing I would be leaving town for a conference and unable to ride her for a few days, I made the most of the time I had with her pre- conference. I had been wanting to hack her around the property with Georgie (who’s owner is here visiting) but time just hasn’t allowed for that to happen. So, I put on my big girl pants and hacked her out by myself.

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Not surprisingly, it was uneventful. She DID keep halting when we got under the irrigation, so mare DEFINITELY as some sass, or, she just wanted to cool off. Either way, I made sure she understood I was not wanting to get wet and by the third time we passed through, she kept trotting…

So, all in all, I couldn’t be happy with her! It’s been fun introducing new things and I must say I already trust her so much. Which probably helps- I’m relaxed, so she is relaxed. I can’t wait to get home again and play with her. I need to remind myself to continue to go slow with her, because right now I feel like we’re capable of accomplishing anything together.

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I get really excited to speak at conferences, but really just can’t wait to be home with my pets!

Fraggle Friday: A Lifetime of Worry

Not surprisingly, lately, I have a lot of angst about Stella.

I worry she won’t eat. I worry she won’t sleep through the night. I worry that she will have another seizure. All I seem to do is worry. Which, I guess, considering her condition, is “normal.”

But then I realized that I have spent pretty much Stella’s entire life worrying about her.

Seriously.

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Young Stella looking for birds

When she was a young dog, I had a friend look after her when I went out of town. I left a 5 page instruction sheet and called at least once a day to check on her. When I returned, my friend joked that Stella had a great time just being a dog without someone worrying about her all the time. It maybe wasn’t the nicest thing to say, but now, 12 or so years later, I kinda get what she meant.

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Stella has driven across the country with me 5 times. She really enjoyed Theodore Roosevelt National Park!

I have worried every day that Stella would get hit by a car.

I worried that she would get hurt while running like a maniac in the hills

I worried that she didn’t get enough exercise.

I worried that she didn’t get enough to eat.

I worried that she was home alone too long.

I worried she had to potty while I was out and couldn’t.

I worried more about Stella’s general well being than I have worried about anything else. For almost 15 years. And weirdly, nothing terrible has ever happened. She ate when she was hungry. Was smart enough to avoid getting hurt when out on runs. She’d have to be slow and idiotic to be hit by a car (at least in her mind) so THAT wasn’t happening. She never went potty in the house and seemed fine snoozing away the day until I got home.

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How is her hair so perfect in the water??

So, really, she’s had a pretty great life, catered to her by my angst.

And while I probably wouldn’t change a thing from our past, my hope is that with Siri, maybe I can chill out just a little bit.

I’m also hopeful I get to worry about Stella for a while longer.

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Back in 2009, right before I left Ithaca NY for Idaho.

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PONY'TUDE

An amateur eventer's adventures

Poor Woman Showing

An amateur eventer's adventures

Live Your Adventure

Tara - Horse lover, horse rider, horse enthusiast

SmartPak Blog

An amateur eventer's adventures

In Omnia Paratus

An amateur eventer's adventures

The Blog of Travel

Motorbikes, dogs and a lot of traveling.

Simple Changes

An off the track thoroughbred and his girl.

Hunky Hanoverian

An amateur eventer's adventures

*TBA*

An amateur eventer's adventures

Cob Jockey

An amateur eventer's adventures

She Moved to Texas

An amateur eventer's adventures

Guinness on Tap

An amateur eventer's adventures

Equestrian At Hart

adventures in riding & life

 Clover Ledge Farm

An amateur eventer's adventures

Viva Carlos

An amateur eventer's adventures

Horsemanship 101

Leprechaun Lane Training Center's Guide to Horsemanship

ridingwithscissors.wordpress.com/

Horse humor and the musings of a weenie adult eventer

May As Well Event

Here's To Not Following Your Own Advice

A Yankee in Paris

No animals were harmed in the making of this blog...

Horse Listening

Horses. Riding. Life.

EquiNovice

Becoming a student of horsemanship.

Chronicles of a "Mini-Pro"

Celebrating the incurable addiction which is being an equestrian

A Horse For Elinor

Dressage On A Dime

Charley's Angel Eventing

Just a High Schooler Living for Jesus & Ponies